Blogs

Helen & Newton Harrison "Becoming Artists" exhibit case

Mediating curatorial and conservation priorities in physical library displays

February 24, 2017
by Elizabeth A Fischbach

As the person who serves as the liaison between exhibit “curators” (exhibit content selectors—variously students, donors, faculty, and fellow library staff) and the conservation team, I often find myself navigating the terrain between a curator’s vision for a show and the realities of protecting materials from damage. My job is to midwife the ideas presented by content creators and bring them into the world of the gallery in as creative and revealing a way possible. Often it involves negotiating between competing priorities and points of view: curatorial ambitions and desires on the one hand and protecting library resources on the other. A couple of somewhat fictionalized conversations from planning the current Terraforming exhibit in Green Library, which draws on the Helen and Newton Harrison Papers, illustrate the process.

Tōshōsha Engi scrolls

Collotype art reproduction of restricted 1636-1640 Tōshōsha Engi scrolls now available online

February 16, 2017
by Astrid Johannah Smith

These delicately nuanced early reproductions were made using a collotype printing method, which uses light-sensitive gelatin colloid coated plates and photographic negatives to create fine detail. They were presented to Stanford University as a gift from David Starr Jordan, which is noted on a small commemorative plaque tucked in the box. "Before the Meiji Restoration of 1868, the pictures were inspected by the successive Shoguns on the occasion of their periodical visits to the Temples at Nikko, but no other persons were as a matter of fact permitted to view them." The pictures are now considered national treasures. See the fully digitized items online.

Rally the Resistance Rally, 2017

Archives launches women, LGBTQ and communities of color initiative

February 14, 2017
by Daniel Hartwig

The Stanford University Archives is proud to announce an ongoing initiative to acquire, process and digitize materials documenting Stanford women, the LGBTQ community, and communities of color. Following on the heels of its Stanford Stories exhibit carried out for the University’s 125th Anniversary, the Archives seeks to expand the range of voices and materials in its collections representing Stanford’s rich history. To that extent, we are happy to share our progress thus far.

A productive week at Geo4LibCamp 2017

February 7, 2017
by Darren Hardy PhD

Geo4LibCamp is a hands-on meeting to bring together those building repository and associated services for geospatial data to share best practices, solve common problems, and address technical issues. We met at Stanford University for the second Geo4LibCamp unconference from January 30 until February 3, 2017. Nearly 50 attendees from 30 institutions participated in the main three day event, and about 20 attendees for the two day post-conference working sessions. The institutions were primarily academic research libraries -- Alberta, Arizona State, California State, Chicago, Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State, Colorado at Boulder, Connecticut State Library, Cornell, Data Curation Experts, Mapzen, Michigan, Minnesota, Moss Landing Marine Labs, Nebraska at Lincoln, New York U, Northwestern, Notre Dame, Princeton, Purdue, Rice, Stanford, UC Berkeley, UC Davis, UC Riverside, UC Santa Barbara, UC Santa Cruz, UCLA, Wisconsin – Milwaukee, and Yale.

Entry from Hisao Magario's diary

East Asia Library receives donation of mid-20th century Japanese diaries

February 6, 2017
by Joshua Capitanio

The East Asia Library recently received the valuable donation of a set of diaries written by Hisao Magario (1889 - 1960), a Japanese businessman who operated an import business in Oakland and San Francisco during the mid-20th century. The forty-one volumes of diaries cover the period between 1920 and 1960, describing Magario's time in the United States during the years 1920-1926 and his subsequent activities after returning to Japan.

AV Artifact Atlas on GitHub homepage

Artifact Atlas now on GitHub

February 3, 2017
by Geoff Willard

The AV Artifact Atlas has been one of the Stanford Media Preservation Lab's longest running projects (for background on what it is, see this short 2013 post), but recently it has been moved to GitHub. Update your links!

AVAA site: https://bavc.github.io/avaa/

Link to GitHub repository: https://github.com/bavc/avaa

As always, contributors are most welcome, and hopefully the site's new home on GitHub will encourage engagement. Please help us:

- Edit content

- Add new content

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