Blogs

Music From Math - Digitizing the Works of Max V. Mathews

August 27, 2012
by Geoff Willard

What's the first name you think of when considering the development of electronic music? Edgard Varèse? John Cage? Karlheinz Stockhausen? Now how about computer music? Max Mathews should be at the top of your list. While at Bell Laboratories in 1957, Mathews wrote the program MUSIC, ushering in an era of digital synthesis and composition. MUSIC went through many iterations, but its lasting influence can be seen in contemporary programs such as Max/MSP, itself named after the late pioneer.

Beautiful Books in the Stanford Digital Repository

August 16, 2012
by David A Jordan

Originally posted in ReMix: The Stanford University Libraries Newsletter

Sixteen volumes selected from among the Libraries’ “beautiful books” were recently added – approximately 1,400 images in all – to the Stanford Digital Repository, where anyone can
now view Renaissance artistic visions of the fall of Troy, see the universe as Galileo showed it to hiscontemporaries, hear Dr. Johnson pitching his idea for the first serious English dictionary, and admire one of the last magnificent examples of the golden age of English fine printing just before WWII. As with all of Stanford’s rare and antiquarian books, the printed originals of these digitized volumes are cataloged inSearchWorks and can be requested for viewing in the Special Collections reading room. Now, via each item’s PURL (persistent uniform resource locator, which ensures that these materials are available from a single URL over the long term), researchers can work with digital as well as original printed editions. Scholars have discovered, though, that each has its own advantages and disadvantages, and often find it useful to consult both in their work.

Artemisia title page

Domenico Cimarosa. Artemisia : Dramma Tragico. Venezia, [1801].

August 9, 2012
by Ray Heigemeir

Artemesia is the last of Cimarosa’s almost sixty operas, with libretto by Count Giovanni Battista Colloredo who wrote under the pen name of Cratisto Jamejo. Cimarosa completed only two of the acts; the third was completed by an unknown person. The opera premiered at La Fenice in Venice in January 1801, was performed in Florence in 1806, and was likely performed in England, Germany and Russia. Arias from the opera were published in the early nineteenth century and the overture in 1957. However the full opera has never been published.

FRED - Imaging Lab

DLSS and Special Collections experts in born digital materials to host colleagues from the Bodleian Library, Oxford

July 30, 2012
by Michael G Olson

Glynn Edwards, Peter Chan and Michael Olson from Special Collections and Digital Library Systems and Services will be hosting colleagues from the Bodleian Library, Oxford this August.  Our colleagues from the Bodleian will be spending a day and half at Stanford to learn more about how we are describing born digital archival materials.

SMPL Renews Partnership with California Audiovisual Preservation Project

July 26, 2012
by Michael Angeletti

In an important collaboration this month, Stanford Media Preservation Lab and the Department of Special Collections & University Archives are participating in the California Audiovisual Preservation Project, a pioneering statewide initiative, for a third round in a row. The CAVPP is providing funds to reformat film and video selections from SULAIR’s collections, including newly resurrected video from the Stanford Prison Experiment and the Stanford University Film Collection. These items will be sent to an outside vendor with the equipment necessary to capture preservation-quality digital files from these unique materials in obsolete formats. The digitized content will be preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository and made broadly available to the public through the California Light and Sound collection at the Internet Archive.

New Collections Added to Stanford Digital Repository in June, 2012

July 23, 2012

In June, approximately 68,000 images representing nearly 300 items across several collections were accessioned to the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR). The items include:

  • Archives Parlementaires (81 books, 64,800 pages)
  • Classic Papyrii (44 fragments, 88 images)
  • Stanford Oral History Project (140 interviews, 2110 files)
  • Special Collections Materials (18 photo collections, 900 images)

While many of these objects are already discoverable via SearchWorks others will get SearchWorks records in the coming months. However, all materials are currently available via the item’s PURL (a persistent URL which ensure that these materials are available from a single URL over the long-term, regardless of changes in file location or application technology).

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