Blog topic: Digital preservation

Home page for the SDR online deposit application

Stanford Digital Repository supports campus Open Access needs

October 19, 2021
by Dr. Amy E. Hodge

Stanford’s Open Access (OA) Policy, approved by the Faculty Senate in November 2020, established the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) as the home for open access articles at Stanford. Over the past year, Stanford Libraries has created and released an improved web application for depositing content into the SDR. With this new application, it's now easier for any Stanford depositor  -- faculty, post-docs, and students alike -- to take advantage of open access features such as ORCID iDs and DOIs, and to make your OA articles available under an open license.

Composite view of one section of the mural with full color, 3d photgrammetry, and a blend of the two.

Scientific Imaging of Diego Rivera's 'Pan American Unity' Mural

Stanford Libraries is proud to announce a new Spotlight exhibit: Diego Rivera's San Francisco Masterpiece - Virtual Preservation of "Pan American Unity". The exhibit is devoted to rich scientific imaging of Diego Rivera's 1940 mural Unión de la Expresión Artistica del Norte y Sur de este Continente (The Marriage of the Artistic Expression of the North and of the South on this Continent), also known as Pan American Unity. It highlights 3D photgrammetric documentation of the mural created by Cultural Heritage Imaging as part of an arrangement between City College of San Franscisco and SFMOMA to display the mural at SFMOMA from 2021 to 2023. This exhibit takes advantage of both the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) and the Mirador viewer to allow users to explore the mural's colors and surface textures, the progress of the work as it was created, and work done by SFMOMA and Site & Studio Conservation to describe the condition of the mural.

Ted Nelson email archive now available

Stanford Libraries’ Department of Special Collections is excited to announce that the email archive of Ted Nelson is now available to researchers. Theodor Holm "Ted" Nelson is an information technology pioneer and systems humanist who began his work in these areas in the 1960s. Nelson founded Project Xanadu, a global hypertext system designed to permanently connect different types of documents. He also coined the terms hypertext and hypermedia. The Ted Nelson email archive contains 236,779 messages related to Nelson’s life and work between 2001-2019, covering his more recent work.

Launching the new Shared ePADD Discovery Module

The ePADD Project Team and the ePADD Discovery Consortium is excited to announce the launch of a new shared ePADD Discovery websiteePADD, the free and open source software for appraisal, processing, and providing access to email archives, developed by Stanford Libraries provides a stand alone email Discovery Module that can be hosted on a public web server.

Shah Commission of Inquiry Report 1, page 1

LEGACIES OF CONFLICT in South Asia: The Right to Heal

How many of us first developed an understanding of the Indian subcontinent and its peoples from the writings of Vikram Seth, Salman Rushdie or Rohinton Mistry? Their stories, A Suitable Boy, Midnight's Children and A Fine Balance, introduced the rest of the world to the socio-political tensions fomenting in India since its independence from Britain in 1947.

ePADD version 8 now available

The ePADD development team is excited to announce the release of version 8!

ePADD is free and open source software developed by Stanford Libraries' Special Collections & University Archives that uses natural language processing and machine learning to support archival appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery for email of historical or cultural value.

Improved Performance for Large Collections

Çatalhöyük image collection released on Searchworks

February 11, 2021
by Claudia A. Engel

A current effort is underway to archive archaeological research documentation from Çatalhöyük -- a 9000 year old neolithic settlement in the central plains of Turkey widely recognized as one of the most important archaeological sites in the world -- in the Stanford Digital Repository. We have just achieved our first major milestone and released the image collection of about 144,000 images on Searchworks.

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