Blog topic: Digital preservation

Launching the new Shared ePADD Discovery Module

The ePADD Project Team and the ePADD Discovery Consortium is excited to announce the launch of a new shared ePADD Discovery websiteePADD, the free and open source software for appraisal, processing, and providing access to email archives, developed by Stanford Libraries provides a stand alone email Discovery Module that can be hosted on a public web server.

Shah Commission of Inquiry Report 1, page 1

LEGACIES OF CONFLICT in South Asia: The Right to Heal

How many of us first developed an understanding of the Indian subcontinent and its peoples from the writings of Vikram Seth, Salman Rushdie or Rohinton Mistry? Their stories, A Suitable Boy, Midnight's Children and A Fine Balance, introduced the rest of the world to the socio-political tensions fomenting in India since its independence from Britain in 1947.

ePADD version 8 now available

The ePADD development team is excited to announce the release of version 8!

ePADD is free and open source software developed by Stanford Libraries' Special Collections & University Archives that uses natural language processing and machine learning to support archival appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery for email of historical or cultural value.

Improved Performance for Large Collections

Çatalhöyük image collection released on Searchworks

February 11, 2021
by Claudia A. Engel

A current effort is underway to archive archaeological research documentation from Çatalhöyük -- a 9000 year old neolithic settlement in the central plains of Turkey widely recognized as one of the most important archaeological sites in the world -- in the Stanford Digital Repository. We have just achieved our first major milestone and released the image collection of about 144,000 images on Searchworks.

ePADD Version 7.3.5 Alpha now available

January 14, 2021
by Sally DeBauche

The ePADD development team is excited to announce the release of version 7.3.5 alpha!

ePADD is free and open source software developed by Stanford Libraries' Special Collections & University Archives that uses natural language processing and machine learning to support archival appraisal, processing, discovery, and delivery for email of historical or cultural value.

Providing large scale text corpora for research

The Stanford RegLab and the Stanford Literary Lab have both been processing and analyzing large text corpora for many years now and both recently received a chunk of OCR content from Stanford Libraries thanks to work that DLSS has undertaken to retrieve the digital files of more than 3 million items from the Stanford Libraries catalog that were scanned by Google.

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