Blog topic: Fun facts

Eyeglasses over an open book

Happy 120th birthday to Aldous Huxley, born July 26, 1894!

July 23, 2014

“There are things known and there are things unknown and in between are the doors of perception.”
-Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley is widely known as the author of Brave New World, The Doors of Perception, and Island. Did you know he was also the grandson of scientist Thomas Henry Huxley, a Hollywood screenwriter who wrote the screenplay for Pride and Prejudice (1940), lectured on the “Human Potential” at The Esalen Institute in the 1960’s, and was once Eric Arthur Blair’s French teacher at Eton College before Eric went on to write 1984 and Animal Farm with the pen name George Orwell?

Special Collections at Stanford University Libraries has a sketchbook, which Huxley used when he was 17 years old. Dated March 7-July 6, 1912, it is possible that Huxley brought the sketchbook along with him during his travels through Marburg, Germany before attending Oxford University in the fall of 1913.

Steve Schneider [photographer unknown].

In Honor of Earth Day

Dr. Steve Schneider was inspired to be involved in climate change and global warming in part because of Earth Day.

Like his eco-ally Carl Sagan, Schneider was a scientist able to Successfully get information to the public. Sagan had his television show Cosmos (recently revitalized by Neil deGrasse Tyson and Sagan’s widow, Ann Druyan—check your local listings).

Schneider wrote popular science books, did radio interviews around the world and appeared in movies and on television.

Stephen Henry Schneider

Growth of a climate expert

Dr. Steve Schneider talks about how he became interested in earth systems and in atmospheric research in this excerpt from an interview done by Gray Thompson in 1992

“I was actually born in New York City. I didn’t live in it until I went back to Columbia University 17 years later. And I grew up in [Woodmere,] Long Island. And what I remember enjoying a lot about Long Island before the developers hacked down all the woods was getting dropped off in a square mile of woods which I used to call “the deep, dark forest…” and run around and just enjoy streams and nature.

Abraham Tewolde

Archive of Recorded Sound intern Abraham Tewolde

It is my pleasure to introduce Abraham Tewolde, a new intern at the Archive of Recorded Sound who is taking part in Stanford University Libraries 1st-generation summer intern program this summer.  During his time here Abraham will be learning how a sound archive functions and operates, including work on finding aids, digitization, inventory control, accessioning, and research skills.

Abraham will also be a guest blogger during his time here. Please enjoy below the first of a series of posts Abraham will be offering over the summer. 

Shelves of books at Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Library

What resources are important to faculty? Initial survey results

January 17, 2013

In late December, we surveyed Stanford faculty in the Schools of Humanities & Sciences, Engineering, Education, and Earth Sciences about the “many kinds of resources that might be important to your research”. We are still working on a full analysis of all the data generated by the survey, but wanted to go ahead and start sharing some initial results.

Pages

RSS
accessibilityaccessprivsarrow-circle-rightaskus-chataskus-librarianbarsblogsclosecoffeecomputercomputersulcontactsconversationcopierelectricaloutleteventsexternal-linkfacebook-circlegroupstudyhoursindividualinterlibrarynewsnextoffcampusopenlateoutdoorpeoplepolicypreviousprinterprojectsquietreservesscannersearchstudysupportingtabletourstwitter-circleworking