Blog topic: Government information

Text of the 19th Amendment

100th Anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

August 18, 2020
by Kris Kasianovitz

"The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

-Text of the Nineteenth Amendment

On August 18, 1920, the state of Tennessee became the thirty-sixth state to ratify the 19th Amendment. Congress passed House Joint Resolution No. 1 (H. J. Res. 1) on June 4, 1919. It took another year and almost two more months for the required three-fourths of state legislatures to ratify the amendment before it could be added to the Constitution of the United States. The National Park Service 19th Amendment by State guide provides a good overview of the ratification by states and territories. Prior to the ratification of this amendment, some states and territories had already granted women full or partial voting rights for president only. 

ANSI

ANSI releases select standards for COVID-19 support (UPDATED)

Several librarians across the United States have been petitioning ISO and ANSI to release or open up access to several critical standards in the response efforts to the COVID-19 pandemic. ANSI has announced a portal that contains several of these important standards, including standards for the fabrication of ventilators and standards for incident management response, released to the public. At this time, 31 of these ISO standards have been released, and you can access them by visiting the following links.

Technical reports

Databases of the week: let's get technical with tech reports

February 4, 2020
by Zac Painter

Technical reports are a form of the “grey literature” which is extremely important for researchers in a variety of fields. While most technical reports aren’t strictly “academic work”, they often contain valuable information for researchers. Finding technical reports can be tricky, and there are no real standards for how they can be accessed. Nonetheless, we have a few suggestions for you!

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