COVID-19 Libraries update

All libraries are CLOSED due to poor air quality. Online services are available.
For updates visit library.stanford.edu/alerts.

Access to campus libraries is limited. Please explore our online resources & services. We’re here, ask us!

Blog topic: University Archives

 Bracero letters, 1943

Undelivered 1940s Mexican letters to Pacific Northwest relatives

September 23, 2020
by Adan Griego
Mrs. Fidencia Abila was probably relieved that her son Salvador looked plump (“estas muy gordo”) in the photos (“retratos”) he sent from the United States. He was part of the Bracero Program enacted through several bilateral agreements signed by United States and Mexico between 1942 and 1964. The program brought thousands of Mexican men as short-term workers, primarily in agriculture, contributing with their “brazos” (arms) to the overall war effort as our country made a full commitment to World War II and later the Korean War.
 

Stanford Special Collections & University Archives share statement on potentially harmful language in cataloging and archival description

September 9, 2020
by Ann K.D. Myers

Stanford Libraries’ Department of Special Collections and University Archives has published a Statement on Potentially Harmful Language in Cataloging and Archival Description. The statement was developed by staff across the department over the past two months, with additional input from staff in Stanford Libraries’ Metadata Development Unit...

The First Women's suffrage Picket Line-College Day in the picket line

Stanford University and the Women’s Suffrage Movement

August 26, 2020
by Presley A Hubschmitt

On this day, 100 years ago, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States was ratified, which provided some women the right to vote. The process that led to the ratification of the 19th Amendment can provide historical context for the voting and women’s rights issues that are still at the forefront of American politics today. Although it took until 1920 for the 19th Amendment to be ratified, states like California were attempting to pass women’s suffrage laws beginning in the 1890s. In 1911, Californians finally passed a referendum granting women the right to vote in the state. With the suffrage movement making headway in California politics, Stanford University also felt the stirrings of the movement on campus.

Dinah Handel, Stanford Libraries

Dinah Handel has new 20% assignment in University Archives

July 7, 2020
by Josh Schneider

We are excited to share that beginning July 13, Dinah Handel, Digitization Service Manager in DLSS, will begin a new 20% assignment with the Stanford Archives. She will be working on a variety of projects that advance the Department of Special Collections & University Archives’ commitment to anti-racism, diversity, equity, and inclusion, as well as serving as a DLSS liaison to foster collaboration across the two departments. (...)

Mario Pamplona

An Interview with Mario Pamplona

June 16, 2020
by Josh Schneider

The following is an interview with Mario Pamplona, Operations Manager for Library Privileges at Stanford Libraries. Mario has collaborated with Stanford Archives over the past several months on the development of LibGuides, including the recently published Black Students at Stanford University LibGuide.

Pages

RSS
accessibilityaccessprivsarrow-circle-rightaskus-chataskus-librarianbarsblogsclosecoffeecomputercomputersulcontactsconversationcopierelectricaloutleteventsexternal-linkfacebook-circlegroupstudyhoursindividualinterlibrarynewsnextoffcampusopenlateoutdoorpeoplepolicypreviousprinterprojectsquietreservesscannersearchstudysupportingtabletourstwitter-circleworking