Blog topic: University Archives

John McCarthy Papers; sc0524_1995-247_b27_f12

Six new digital collections now available in SearchWorks!

These new collections take advantage of recently released functionality that provides researchers with new rich discovery and access capabilities for finding and working with digital collection content. Researchers may now discover the following materials: 

Pleistocene Lake Surprise

This collection provides supplemental data and spreadsheets related to the M.S. thesis in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences by Daniel Ibarra (December, 2014) and the subsequent publication in the Geological Society of America Bulletin (Ibarra et al., 2014). For additional information about this collection, check out this recent blog post by Amy Hodge.

Collection Contact: Amy Hodge

Karen Offen & Marilyn Boxer

Archives acquires papers of Marilyn Boxer and Karen Offen

July 29, 2014
by Daniel Hartwig

The Archives is pleased to announce that it has acquired the papers of two noted scholars of women's studies: Marilyn Boxer and Karen Offen.

Marilyn Boxer (Ph.D, UC Riverside) is emeritus professor of history at San Francisco State University and former lecturer and scholar at the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at Stanford. She has held administrative appointments at San Diego State University, including Chair of the Department of Women's Studies (1974-1980) and Dean of College of Arts and Letters (1985-1989); as well as at San Francisco State University where she served as Vice-president for Academic Affairs (1989-1996). Boxer is the author of When women ask the questions: creating women's studies in America (1998). She has also co-edited three books: Socialist women: European socialist feminism in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (1978); Connecting spheres: European women in a globalizing world, 1500 to the present (1987); and Clara Zetkin: National and International Contexts (2012). In 2004, Boxer received the Helen Hawkins Feminist Activist Award for Betterment of Women's Lives.

Keith Johnstone

Archives acquires Keith Johnstone papers

July 9, 2014
by Daniel Hartwig

The University Archives is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Keith Johnstone papers. Johnstone, a British and Canadian pioneer of improvisational theatre, is best known for inventing the Impro System and Theatresports, the latter of which has become a staple of modern improvisational comedy and is the inspiration for the television shows such as "Whose Line Is It Anyway?." As an educator, playwright, actor and theatre director Johnstone's ideas about improvisation, behaviour and performance appeal to a wide variety of groups. From actors to psychotherapists, improvisation companies to theatre schools and companies, business and management training specialists and humanities research institutes, universities and film production companies have invited him to come to teach them about his ideas, and how they might apply them.

Jim McRae

Project South coordinator revisits collection 50 years later

May 8, 2014
by Daniel Hartwig

On April 24th, the University Archives was pleased to welcome back to the farm Jim McRae ('68), coordinator of the KZSU-sponsored Project South, which interviewed civil rights workers during the summer of 1965. Jim (seen here examining interview transcripts) sat down with us to talk about the project and even provided some personal photographs (below) and documents

Project South, 1965During the summer of 1965, eight students from Stanford University spent ten weeks in the southern states tape-recording information on student participation in the Civil Rights Movement. The eight interviewers -- Mary Kay Becker, Mark Dalrymple, Roger Dankert, Richard Gillam, James McRae, Penny Niland, Jon Roise, and Julie Wells -- were sponsored by KZSU, Stanford's student radio station, and their original intent was to gather material suitable for rebroadcasting in the form of radio programs. Northern college students who were working in the South for the first time were the major focus, although many other topics were also investigated. To find out why these students decided to go to the South to work for the movement, what they expected to find there, what they did find, the pressures they experienced, their reaction to these pressures, what they accomplished, and what they planned to do in the future (both near and distant), they interviewed as many students as possible. What is planned is a series of programs expressing in the volunteers' and workers' own words, their motivations and their feelings towards the many aspects of the South and of the Civil Rights Movement experienced that summer.

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